PLAY ONLINE FASHION SOLITAIRE – FASHION SOLITAIRE
Play Online Fashion Solitaire – Oscar Fashion 2011 – Latino Fashion Week.

Play Online Fashion Solitaire

Play Online Fashion Solitaire – Oscar Fashion 2011 – Latino Fashion Week.

Play Online Fashion Solitaire

play online fashion solitaire

    solitaire

  • a gem (usually a diamond) in a setting by itself
  • a dull grey North American thrush noted for its beautiful song
  • extinct flightless bird related to the dodo
  • A ring set with such a gem
  • A diamond or other gem set in a piece of jewelry by itself
  • Any of various card games played by one person, the object of which is to use up all one’s cards by forming particular arrangements and sequences

    fashion

  • Make into a particular or the required form
  • Use materials to make into
  • make out of components (often in an improvising manner); “She fashioned a tent out of a sheet and a few sticks”
  • manner: how something is done or how it happens; “her dignified manner”; “his rapid manner of talking”; “their nomadic mode of existence”; “in the characteristic New York style”; “a lonely way of life”; “in an abrasive fashion”
  • characteristic or habitual practice

    online

  • With processing of data carried out simultaneously with its production
  • In or into operation or existence
  • on-line: on a regular route of a railroad or bus or airline system; “on-line industries”
  • on-line: connected to a computer network or accessible by computer; “an on-line database”
  • on-line(a): being in progress now; “on-line editorial projects”
  • While so connected or under computer control

    play

  • a theatrical performance of a drama; “the play lasted two hours”
  • Engage in activity for enjoyment and recreation rather than a serious or practical purpose
  • Engage in (a game or activity) for enjoyment
  • a dramatic work intended for performance by actors on a stage; “he wrote several plays but only one was produced on Broadway”
  • Amuse oneself by engaging in imaginative pretense
  • participate in games or sport; “We played hockey all afternoon”; “play cards”; “Pele played for the Brazilian teams in many important matches”

play online fashion solitaire – 14K Yellow

14K Yellow Gold Round Solitaire Diamond Pendant (5/8 ctw, H-I/I1)
14K Yellow Gold Round Solitaire Diamond Pendant (5/8 ctw, H-I/I1)

This dazzling sparkling timeless pendant is classic and can be used as an engagement pendant, anniversary pendant, bridal pendant, promise pendant, proposal pendant, fashion pendant, wedding pendant, cocktail pendant and also to represent eternal love between you and that special someone.

This 14k Yellow gold round diamond pendant is prong set with 1 round diamond. The total carat weight is 0.50 cts. The diamond is H-I color and I1 clarity.

This is DivaDiamonds.net item number C3289.

Day 362: Computer work

Day 362: Computer work
I was SO bored today. I wandered around my apartment, organizing random piles of stuff. I really had no motivation to do anything. I actually spent most of the day online, talking to people, getting information for my classes that start next week, researching the companies I start working for next week, updating flickr, etc. I’ve been itching to play cards, but since most people are home or working, I settled for an old-fashioned (by that I mean NOT electronic; I actually used a deck of cards) game of solitaire. I played that for a couple hours, then returned to my computer. I’ve actually got plans for tomorrow, so it should automatically be LESS boring. Goodnight!
day 4
saturday: play on the web

Doing online puzzles, like «solitaire» or «soduku» can decrease stress and improve mood, according to new research from East Carolina University, in Greenville, North Carolina.
Because you’re distracted from your worries by the game, your nervous system can relax. Find a game you like, one you become so absorbed in that you lose all track of time and play it daily.

the two-week stress-less plan, real simple, september 2008

I like soduku but I prefer using the newspaper as my screen computer
🙂 old fashion way…

play online fashion solitaire

play online fashion solitaire

Play: How It Shapes the Brain, Opens the Imagination, and Invigorates the Soul
From a leading expert, a groundbreaking book on the science of play, and its essential role in fueling our intelligence and happiness throughout our lives.

We’ve all seen the happiness in the face of a child while playing in the school yard. Or the blissful abandon of a golden retriever racing with glee across a lawn. This is the joy of play. By definition, play is purposeless and all-consuming. And, most important, it’s fun.

As we become adults, taking time to play feels like a guilty pleasure—a distraction from “real” work and life. But as Dr. Stuart Brown illustrates, play is anything but trivial. It is a biological drive as integral to our health as sleep or nutrition. In fact, our ability to play throughout life is the single most important factor in determining our success and happiness.

Dr. Brown has spent his career studying animal behavior and conducting more than six thousand “play histories” of humans from all walks of life—from serial murderers to Nobel Prize winners. Backed by the latest research, Play explains why play is essential to our social skills, adaptability, intelligence, creativity, ability to problem solve, and more. Play is hardwired into our brains—it is the mechanism by which we become resilient, smart, and adaptable people.

Beyond play’s role in our personal fulfillment, its benefits have profound implications for child development and the way we parent, education and social policy, business innovation, productivity, and even the future of our society. From new research suggesting the direct role of three-dimensional-object play in shaping our brains to animal studies showing the startling effects of the lack of play, Brown provides a sweeping look at the latest breakthroughs in our understanding of the importance of this behavior. A fascinating blend of cutting-edge neuroscience, biology, psychology, social science, and inspiring human stories of the transformative power of play, this book proves why play just might be the most important work we can ever do.

An Interview with Dr. Stuart Brown, MD

Q: How do you know play is important to both adults and children?
Dr. Brown: In my career I have reviewed more than 6000 life histories, looking specifically at a person’s play experiences over his or her life. In studying these histories it has become vividly apparent that play is enormously significant for both children and adults. I began thinking about the role of play in our lives while conducting a detailed study of homicidal males in Texas. What I discovered was severe play deprivation in the lives of these murderers. When I later studied highly creative and successful individuals, there was a stark contrast. Highly successful people have a rich play life. It is also established that play affects mental and physical health for both adults and children. A severely play deprived child demonstrates multiple dysfunctional symptoms– the evidence continues to accumulate that the learning of emotional control, social competency, personal resiliency and continuing curiosity plus other life benefits accrue largely through rich developmentally appropriate play experiences. Likewise, an adult who has “lost” what was a playful youth and doesn’t play will demonstrate social, emotional and cognitive narrowing, be less able to handle stress, and often experience a smoldering depression. From an evolutionary point of view, research suggests that play is a biological necessity. There is evidence that suggests the forces that initiate play lie in the ancient survival centers of the brain–the brain stem–where other anciently preserved survival capacities also reside. In other words, play is a basic biological necessity that has survived through the evolution of the brain. And necessity=importance. But one of the strongest arguments for the importance of play is how strongly we identify ourselves through our play behavior. Just look at the eloquent memories of 9-11 victims the New York Times published. The headlines—the summation of a life—were lines like “A Spitball-Shooting Executive,” a “Lover of Laughter.” Play is who we are.
Q: What are the areas of our culture most in need of “play hygiene?”
Dr. Brown: Most adults have “forgotten” what it was like to engage in free play when they were kids. And truthfully, they may have not had much experience with free play when they were young. Beginning in preschool, the natural mayhem that 3-5 year olds engage in (normal rough and tumble play) is usually suppressed by a well meaning preschool teacher and parents who prefer quiet and order to the seeming chaos that is typical of free childhood play. We need adequate play hygiene in preschools so that both parents and preschool teachers recognize the difference between dangerous out of control boundary-less anarchy, and normal play– diving, screaming, chasing, even some punching. When there are smiles and continuing friendships, rambunctious play is healthy. The awareness on the part of parents and teachers of the value of free child-organized–meaning lightly supervised–play for elementary school children at recess is another area where greater insight about play hygiene is needed. Play should also be used with teachers in their classroom, and by parents when they help their child with homework. Learning should not be drudgery. Play promotes true intellectual curiously. It has been shown to increase lifetime performance, just as adequate recess time leads to increased long term academic accomplishments. Also, parents need to control their anxieties about maximizing every minute of their child or young adult’s time to increase their competitiveness and performance so that their college resumes will be strong. With every moment scripted by adult ambitions for them, kids cannot become naturally attuned to their innate talents.
Q: How can a review of one’s own life history of their play help?
Dr. Brown: If adults can begin to reminisce about their happiest and most memorable moments, they can capture the emotion and visual memories of those moments and begin to connect again to what truly excites them in life. Generally, a person’s purest emotional profile—temperament, talents, passions– is reflected in positive play experiences from childhood. If you can understand your own emotional profile when it was in its purest form, you can begin to apply it to your adult life. Going through this process may encourage someone to give serious consideration to shifting to another job that may bring them more joy, or to infuse their current life with those elements that once brought them enlivenment but may have been left behind as they conformed to cultural stereotypes of success.
Q: If you could only cite one discovery you have made about play that continues to excite you what would it be?
Dr. Brown: It is that we, as homo sapiens, are fundamentally equipped for and need to play actively throughout our lifespan by nature’s design. While most social mammals have a life cycle that involves dominance and submissiveness (as in Chimpanzee troops or wolf packs) with play diminishing significantly as adulthood arrives, we retain the biology associated with youthfulness despite still dying of old age! By this I mean that our overall long period of childhood dependency, which is dominated by the need for play, does not end with our reaching adulthood. Our adult biology remains unique among all creatures, and our capacity for flexibility, novelty and exploration persists. If we suppress this natural design, the consequences are dire. The play-less adult becomes stereotyped, inflexible, humorless, lives without irony, loses the capacity for optimism, and generally is quicker to react to stress with violence or depression than the adult whose play life persists. In a world of major continuous change (and we are certainly facing big changes economically now) playful humans who can roll with the punches and innovate through their play-inspired imaginations will better survive. Our playful natures have arrived at this place through the trial and error of millions of years of evolution, and we need to honor our design to play.
Q: Who is your favorite player? Why?
Dr. Brown: The exuberance that is my grandson Leo makes him my current #1 play companion. His innate humor, constant curiosity, ability to make life a playground is so contagious and pure that he sweeps me away. He takes me out of a sense of time, brings me joy, engages me fully, and does so in a climate of love. But I guess I can also muse that my favorite player is God, who somehow put this marvelous divinely superfluous process into the cosmos for us to embrace.

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